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internment camp daily life

This category contains 7 posts

Remembering internment #3: Evelyn Yamashita

On December 8, 1941, 13-year-old Evelyn Yamashita woke to find that a barbed wire fence had been built around her entire community on Thursday Island. The island’s Japanese population were kept there for two weeks until they were transported south to larger camps. Evelyn’s family were interned at Tatura for five and a half years. Continue reading

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Remembering Internment #2: Maurice Shiosaki

“Kite fighting”, sumo wrestling… Maurice Shiosaki has mostly fond memories of being interned at Tatura family camp as a boy. The saddest moment for his family was when it was time to leave. Continue reading

Remembering internment #1: Mary Nakashiba

Former Tatura internee Mary Nakashiba reflects on her time in internment as a teenager—the vitriol of Australians who called for them to be killed, the difficulties her family had mixing with the imperialist Japanese at camp and the internee reaction to the bombing of Darwin. Continue reading

Through a glass darkly: photographs of internment

A look at the photographers—both official and underground—who captured life in internment in the US and Australia: Bill Manbo, Toyo Miyatake, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Hedley Cullen, Colin Halmarick and Yasukichi Murakami. Continue reading

Tatura family internment camp

Update: Vale James Sullivan I was saddened to hear of the recent passing of James Sullivan, a former officer at Tatura internment camp, on March 22, 2012. Jim was 91 years old. I was glad to have had the opportunity to get to know him. He was an entertaining raconteur, keen to share his knowledge, … Continue reading

70th Anniversary of the Loveday camps

Winter in the Riverland district of South Australia is a season of extremes: dry, often gloriously sunny days and nights so bitingly cold it makes it difficult to sleep. I found out first-hand when I visited Barmera in June for the 70th anniversary of the opening of the Loveday internment camps and my hotel ran … Continue reading

Do you have a story about Japanese civilian internees?

As part of my research into Japanese civilians who were interned in Australia during World War II, I’m looking for people who would like to share personal or family stories about Japanese civilian internees (particularly Japanese who were interned at the Loveday camps in South Australia). Can you help? If you are a former internee, … Continue reading

Loveday Camp 14

The entrance to Loveday Camp 14 near Barmera, South Australia, 1945 (Australian War Memorial, ID 122983).